Data Monday: Who Contributes How Much?

by Luke Wroblewski March 28, 2011

I've long been interested in the different ways social models influence online behavior. In particular, what kinds of relationships drive more contribution on Web sites? So I'm collecting data about online contribution in different types of social sites. Here's my latest set:

  • 85% of reads/writes of Facebooks are generated by 20% of users. (source)
  • Roughly 50% of Tweets consumed are generated by just 20,000 elite users or .01% of the total of 190 million users. (source)
  • 5% of Twitter users account for 75% of all activity (June 2009 study of 11.5M users -source)
  • 10% of Twitter users account for 86% of activity (June 2009 study of 11.5M users -source)
  • 10% of Twitter users account for 90% of activity (May 2009 study of 300,542 users -source)
  • .003% of Digg’s users are responsible for 56% of the stories on the site’s home page. (source)
  • There is a .064% creator to consumer ratio on YouTube. (source)
  • The top 15% of the most prolific editors account for 90% of Wikipedia's edits. (source)
  • The top 10% of editors (by edit count) are credited with 86% of PWVs (the number of times a word introduced by an edit is viewed), the top 1% about 70%, and the top 0.1% (4200 users) attributed to 44% of PWVs, i.e. nearly half of Wikipedia's "value" as measured in this study. (source)

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